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An Early Train

An Early Train

This post is part of a series from my two week-long training courses with the Academie Opus Caseus. You can find the rest of these posts by searching for the tag academie-opus-caseus.

I’ve had the privilege (honestly, I consider it rather a gift) to have been able to travel quite steadily since 2004. Travel has been mainly for work and has taken me as far west as California, south as Buenos Aires, and north as Moscow. I love every part of it, including packing and waking up for early departures. It therefore wasn’t too much of a chore to prepare my things and make my way via metro to Gare de Lyon for an early-ish train south.

People like the train in Europe. It’s a bit different than in the US, where because of the distance, cultural preferences, and spotty coverage, we think “if not car, then plane.” European train stations have play important roles in the histories of their countries, and the idea that you’re just a few hours from a new country and culture adds some romanticism to the otherwise speedy, efficient, and relatively inexpensive service. Although some of the romance will be chilled by the heavily-armed forces of order and tight security.

I’ll arrive at Lyon Part Dieu station (look up) at around 10am and make my way to les Halles de Lyon Paul Bocuse, one of Lyon’s primary fresh markets which, a decade ago, were renamed for one of their prodigal sons, the legendary French chef from Lyon. I’m looking forward to wandering around. Sunday is the main market day, and I’ll never tire of seeing so much fresh, natural food all in one place despite the fact I now live crawling distance from my town’s market.

I will meet up with the group at 11am, probably for a short visit of the MonS shop and a chat with Etienne Boissy, the Meilleur Ouvrier of France who runs it, and then eat lunch at the restaurant attached to the shop. Boissy was first in the restaurant business, so the association seems as natural as the products they serve. After that, we’ll be on a short train ride to Roanne, where we’re staying at the Hotel du Golf. Breakfast and dinner are provided at the hotel, which is just fine with me. Some of the best meals I’ve eaten in France have come from the hands of the owner of the lodging. 

 

Fromage

Les Halles & Our First Meeting

Les Halles & Our First Meeting

One Week Until Academie Opus Caseus Training

One Week Until Academie Opus Caseus Training